Defendant Attorneys Charged With Conspiracy in Irvine, California

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According to an Orange County, California, press release from the District Attorney, a husband and wife, both attorneys, were charged with conspiracy for planting drugs in the car of a volunteer elementary school teacher, Jane Doe. Kent Wycliffe Easter, and Jill Bjorkholm Easter, both 38, were arrested on June 19, 2012, by the Irvine Police Department and charged with one felony count each of conspiracy to procure the false arrest and charging of Jane Doe, false imprisonment, and conspiracy to falsely report a crime. If convicted, then they face a maximum sentence of three years in state prison. Defendants were arrested on $20,000 bail and are expected to be arraigned July 17th, at the Central Justice Center in Santa Ana.  Kent Easter has been an active member of the State Bar of California since 1998.  Jill Easter was admitted to the Bar in 1998, but her license is expired. Mr. and Mrs. Easter’s son was a student at the school where Jane Doe volunteered, and defendants are accused of becoming angry with her because they believed she was improperly supervising their son.   Defendants allegedly conspired to have her arrested in retaliation by placing a bag of Vicodin, Percocet, marijuana, and Read More …

Amendment XXVI, Section 1: Empowering America’s Youth

I am pleased to share with you below the recent publication for Constituting America. Amendment XXVI: The right of citizens of the United States, who are 18 years of age or older, to vote, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of age. Throughout our nation’s history the right to vote has remained a cornerstone of cherished civil liberties and democratic processes.  This right, however, was granted to select members of the populace until a century and a half ago. The end of the Civil War brought about 3 “Reconstruction Amendments” aimed to bring constitutionally granted “blessings of liberty” to the black male populace – the 3rd of these, the 15th Amendment, ratified in 1870, granted voting rights regardless of “race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”  Half a century later, women were also granted the right to vote, after various organizations staged a protracted series of processions and protests.  Several countries, such as Sweden, Finland (then known as the Grand Duchy (Dutch-ee)), Britain and Australia, had already forged ground in this area at the end of the 19th century.  The resulting 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, which prohibited state and Read More …